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news coming into the "newsroom" right now. this is about former president george w. bush. we have just learned from his office that a blockage was discovered in an artery in his heart and he had a stent placed to open the blockage. in a statement coming from his office, it says that during his annual physical examination, which he gets at the cooper clinic in dallas, and this happened just yesterday, that this blockage was discovered then. his doctors recommended that he go ahead with this process, so it's a stent being placed in the artery it appears to open the blockage. this is a procedure that was performed successfully this morning, without complication, according to this statement, this took place at texas health presbyterian hospital. he is, according to had his office, in high spirits, eager to return home tomorrow. so he's still in the hospital. and resume his normal schedule on thursday. certainly, they are saying here that it does appear to be somewhat normal and he's trying to get back to work here already this week. according to the statement, he is grateful, of course, to
wrong in eight years of george bush? >> my producer just coughed up a hairball. >>sorry. >>just be grateful current tv doesn't come in "smell-o-vision" >> oh come on! the sweatshirt is nice and all, but i could use a golden lasso. (vo)only on current tv. (vo) later tonight, current tv is the place for compelling true stories. >> jack, how old are you? >> nine. >> this is what 27 tons of marijuana looks like. (vo) with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines, way inside. (vo) from the underworld, to the world of privilege. >> everyone in michael jackson's life was out to use him. (vo) no one brings you more documentaries that are real, gripping, current. >> john: friends, not all that along ago, we were playing where in the world is edward snowden until, of course, he settled into the loving bosom of mother russia. putin will give you asylum or you'll get put in jail. but it turns out the story is much bigger than just ed snowden. do you want to talk conspiracy, my friends, the man snowden is connected to everything happening in the last ten years and we're
calculation and work to win public opinion over. baker understood it. george bush unfortunately never did. what happened was when israel attacked gaza when israel attacked lebanon and the u.s. committed outrages in iran we lost public opinion and we have this guy in tehran becoming the new hero of the arab masses saying to them your governments are doing nothing. i am the one standing up against the west on 2006 the numbers were way up. iran's numbers rose as arab alienation and frustration with the west grew. as the ability or the willingness of their own leaders to challenge the west became obvious they went down and ahmadinejad went up and to chart all assad window. it became the resistance that was fighting for arab honor and a period one one air of honor was viewed after abu ghraib. it's tough. we don't want to remember abu ghraib. the arabs don't. we don't want to think about what the iraq war meant all those years or the continued situation of palestinians over lebanon's beleaguered after all these years and continually under threat. it was occupied for 20 years. we don't want to t
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
president george w. bush made his case for going to war with iraq and why mideast dictator was an essential step for both the united states and the world. >> the iraqi regime is a serious and growing threat to peace. on the commands of a dictator, the regime is armed with biological and chemical weapons, possesses ballistic missiles, promotes international terror, and seeks nuclear weapons. >> nearly 11 years later another u.s. president is explaining why he feels getting involved in the middle east is in the best interest of the u.s. people. my next guest though says the similarities between the two conflicts are few. jane newton small is a terrific reporter and times magazine reporter. you've written an article that a lot of team are talking about for "time," "six ways syria 2013 isn't iraq in 2003." differences you say include how the u.s. is handling the regime, the time commitment given by the u.s., the support from the arab world and yooirp, weapons of mass destruction, and how much support there is from congress. let's begin with the first difference you list. regime change. explain
on today. here's some things we just thought you should know. former president george w. bush is now home from the hospital. a spokesman says mr. bush was discharged earlier today from the dallas hospital where doctors inserted a stint yesterday to clear a blocked artery in his heart. the blockage was found during the former president's annual physical exam. his spokesperson says mr. bush plans to return to his normal schedule tomorrow. >>> more accusations of sexual harassment against san diego mayor bob filner. two more women, both military vets, have come forward to publicly accuse filner of unwanted sexual advances. the women say filner made the advances last year during a conference that focused on military sexual assaults. one of the women recently retrieved a voicemail message from filner in which he told her he did not want to wait to have dinner with her. 13 women are now in awe kccusin him. >>> time for the gut check. the widow of one of 19 firefighters killed in that arizona wildfire is ramping up her fight for benefits for her family. now, julian ashcraft, whose 29-year-old hu
, and that is killing terrorists in mass. the two most hated people in andt are not george bush benjamin netanyahu. it is president obama and patterson. when the egyptians were government,he morsi patterson asked the christian leaders not to take part in a protest. booked -- she was bluntly told to shut up and mind her own business. obama backs terrorists. host: thank you for the call. street9 of the "wall journal." ats really began on july 3 the military deposes president morsi, you can see how the events have unfolded over the last five weeks. ambassador syed spoke here in washington at the institute yesterday, provided a timeline of how things unfolded. it is part of an event that we covered, runs just over an hour. it is available online at our website at www.c-span.org. here is a portion. [video clip] >> polarization of the country. an environment of finances of ,hem, determination, exclusion on a religion basis. fanaticism, discrimination, exclusion, on a religious basis. between whoever is non-muslim brothers and the muslim others, no matter to which religion he or she belongs. for the firs
an issue of some level of hypocrisy in terms of the outrange that was heaped upon the george bush administration with respect to afghanistan and iraq. but there are some slight differences here. one to do with the documented facts of the u.s. of chemical weapons. number two, the general sense that this regime is unhenged and therefore needs to be contained in a way that you didn't necessarily see with the likes of some of the other players over the last few years, whether you're talking iran or whatever. so, i think that there's a different tone that you have with syria that you didn't have with the others. again, i harken back to similarities to kosovo from humanitarian perspective but it does put the democrats in a very ticklish box right now, particularly given the warriness of the american host: jim is on the line from texas. republican line. is whatmy question about this tainted election -- the obama administration. guest: in what respect? irs.r: the guest: the irs is a huge issue. i do not know how that translated in terms of a repressed election. that mightgroups have been
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
there were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. it goes back to the thing we kind of started out with. the federal government is out of control. but it has been predicted by all of the historians that the republic would fail. the question is, how do we teach history, go back, every embrace the thing that made america great? and as i said earlier, i think we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference. i worked every day trying to do things. i am convinced the only way we do that is half the state start exerting their temporary authority and reassessing -- [applause] -- changes to the constitution that restore federalism in the constitution. and so i think that is the way. you are frustrated. you want to see me in washington. asked my staff. as my wife. i want to pull my hair out. you know, i see two things. i see the constitution, and see what is happening to it. then i see grown men and women who know what the constitution says you don't care. that is what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they
, for operations are supported, we cut the budget and increased the number of overseas activities, and george w. bush did not run for president -- if you go back to his campaign, he did not run promising a big defense buildup and he was not intending to make foreign policy the centerpiece of his policy, and he ended up making the most fraught decision about the war in iraq. i do not think cutting our military will be the best way to keep us out of trouble in the south china sea. i want steadiness and resolve and let's sustain the rebalance. that means we can make modest cuts in defense. >> amen. i feel like i should applaud. i think that was very powerful on michael's part. i would not put all my eggs in one basket. i want peace through strength or a modern-day version of it because i want a military that deters. i want other things, too. i want strong allies, our partners' capacity to be robust enough to defend themselves if needed and take care of their neighborhoods, so to speak. i want all of our tools of soft power to be effective, partly through the reinforcement from our hard power. i wa
will ever know what is inside vladimir putin's head. that was the irony of george w. bush coming back from that first meeting with putin and saying, i looked into his eyes and saw the man's soul. nobody really knows what putin is thinking. what we know from his behavior in public statements is, he really values a partner. whether it is an american leader or a leader of any other country , who is in control of his own country, who has a similar level of this vertical of power that putin possesses in russia. when the leader commits something, when president obama says, we will do this, it happens. this was one of the things he saw as different between bush and obama. he viewed bush as a guy who would say something, and would stand behind it, at least as far as his power allowed him to do so. his view of obama has been, he is to subject to domestic political constraints. to domesticbject political constraints. russia acceded to the wto organization. the implement thing legislation, we had to repeal these old, cold war era sanctions to get the benefit. along with that, a lot of folks on the hi
's an attorney. he worked in several capacities when george w. bush was the founder of texas. the halon affiliation and they were delighted that stuart bowen has developed such innovative and attractive materials to understand. i think it really is held that there's a lot of visual presentation of lessons and iraq and the very complicated story of funding what didn't work very well. and how we can do betterh next te. we have invited stuart bowen to meet his presentations first. we will then turn to jim schear, who has recently finished his second tour of the pentagon as an assistant secretary for responsibility for stability operations in his earlier career he was a research scholar at the national defense university, director of research there and worked throughout his career on these questions of stabilization and reconstruction including at the u.n. and some of its early post of war success stories in cambodia, the balkans and elsewhere. so how did stuart bowen ideas, what kind of responses were there more broadly in the pentagon and the interagency community and his own reflections
uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i experienced them. he did, too. it goes back to the thing we started with. this government is on -- out of control. it has been predicted by historians our republic would fail. the question is, how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we re-embraced the things that made america great? as i said earlier, we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a big difference. i worked every day -- > we are going to leave this -- i'm convinced the only way we do that is start reassessing real convention changes to the constitution that restore 0 federalism and a constitutional relationship republic. i think that's the way. you're frustrated. you ought to see me in washington. sk my staff. sk reply wife. i see two things. one, i seed constitution, and i see what's happening to it. then i see grown men and women that don't care. that's what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they ignore what the constitution says because it is better for their political care
happened to george w. bush. i would argue that he overreacted in some ways in terms of completely changing the strategic vision trying to remake the middle east, invading iraq and, you know, stuff like that. you could argue that perhaps the obama administration has under reacted to changes that have happened in the sense of not -- certainly not enunciating whether or not they developed it and overarching strat by for the middle east during and after the arab spring. >> tomorrow on "morning joe," new york police chief ray kelly will be here. >> great. >> also she hosted president obama at her home recently, former host of npr's all things considered, michele norris joins us. >> you did that. >> yeah. >> this weekend. >> he was there this weekend? coming this weekend. going to watch football. >> that's fun. >> he's going to love your apartment. >> little tight, mr. president. >> get together and do the interview. >> lot of toys. >> david letterman reacts to miley's vma performance. news you can't use is next. i'm tony siragusa and i'm training guys who leak a little, to guard their manhood w
shoot our church? they appealed to president george h.w. bush at the time. they appealed to the u.n. someone to stop the slaughter. they will march to this treats free tracing the steps of the funeral two weeks before. some putting their hands up in the thee sign shouting viva sebastian. thousands from work school and home and they march to the santa cruz cemetery. when we got there we were interviewing people. why are you risking your life to do this and they would say for my mother, for my father, for my village that was wiped out and from the direction the procession had come we saw hundreds of indignation soldiers carrying their u.s. m-16s in the ready position marching up to the crowd. 90% of the weapons used were from the united states. the indonesian army was arms trained and financed by the united states and on this day was no different. the soldiers marched 10 to 12 abreast. allen and i were interviewing people in the middle of the crowd and allen suggested we walk to the front of the crowd. we knew the indonesian military had committed many massacres they had never done
george w. bush and principal deputy press secretary. and john verrico, president-elect of the national association of government communicators. so starting with carolyn, let's hear what you have to say, give us your overview of the subject. >> i'm going to tell you about a couple surveys i've conducted this year, and the previous year. that are relevant to the topic we're discussing tonight. first, i surveyed reporters who cover federal agencies here in washington. i've got 146 respondents within margin of error of about 7%. then i surveyed current and former members of the national association of government communicate is, at 154 responses from a margin of error of about 4.3%. i'm going to throw some numbers at you but i want to quantify the situation. my questions focus on the indie thing process. for someone to talk about preapproval and routing. 98% of public affairs officers believe that they have a better idea than reporters about who in the agencies would be the best person to give an interview on a given topic. three quarters of journalists report they have to give approval fro
of defense in the george h w bush administration. who morrow is at the end covers the court for the national law journal and prior to that, he was a reporter for " legal times" and" usa today." i want to introduce terry to wner in the middle of all these reporters. she is here because she is an academic from oakland university who studies to things that are quite relevant to this particular panel. one is the supreme court and the press and the other is the role of new media. we will start with professor towner and after she finishes her presentation, we will go tonythe line from tom on and then we will open it up for questions. oakland university located in rochester, michigan. i specialize in american politics and media and politics and this is one of the reasons i am here. onresearch tends to focus the role of social media and campaigns and elections with the specific focus on the task to presidential elections, dubbed as they web 2.0 elections. examined how journalists and reporters frame media coverage of the court particularly regarding affirmative action cases. recently, the cont
the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i went to kick off the panel with you. coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that it would not be your traditional cyclical recovery. unless the mindset in washington changed, and there was a better understanding of the underlying dynamics, we risked getting stuck. in a keyword of unusually sluggish clerk -- growth, high on implement, that is when it materialized. concept of the economy stuck in second gear. let me push this analogy. it is not just stuck in second gear, it is being driven on a foggy road. there is some good news. we are doing better than others. europe was in reverse and just went to neutral. japan has been neutral for a long time and just jumps to first gear. we are d
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
in the united states and certainly more than mayor sanchez and much more popular than george bush. but they are in these and untenable situation with the success is the unfavorable referendum because yet they have certain personality qualities and visions that make them suspect by their peers like the 19th century western that we see whether high noon, ethan edwards magnificence 73 bring the people in and they are suspect figures. we want them to get rid of the cattlemen but it is better than everyone or that they take the badge so whether real like it or not it did not and very well with themistocles ends with suicide 20 years later and tell sorus ended up the popular tradition ended up as dave we were trying to defend what he did but was not popular. for rescue ridgway was not made chairman of the joint chiefs and eisenhower he said. >> host: did not take thistles. was not ridgway but van fleet w. was not in the theater but he got involved with material controversy so finished the manuscript the petite blonde as she did have problems but these are controversial a and after the s
like, why the indonesian military shoot our church? they appeal to president george h.w. bush, and appealed to the eun, and marched through the streets, retracing the steps of the funeral two weeks before. some putting their hands up in the v sign-chanting, viva east timor, viva independence, incredibly brave. and i that marched from schools and home and march to the santa cruz cemetery. when we got there we were interviewing people. why are you risking your life to do this? and they would say, for my mother. for my father. for my village. it was wiped out. and then from the direction the procession has come we saw hundreds of indonesian soldiers carrying their u.s. m-16s at the ready position marching up on the crowd. 90% of the weapons used were from the united states. the army was armed, trained and financed be the united states. and in this day it was no different. the soldiers marched up ten to 12 abreast. alan and i were interviewing people in the middle of the crowd. and allen suggest we walk to the front of the crowd, because we knew that the indonesian military commit
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)